Toque & Canoe contest

Where's YOUR favourite Canadian day hike?

Goldilocks Trail / Island Lake Lodge / Photo by Mike McPhee, @mcphoto99 on Instagram

Attention all hiking enthusiasts! We’re joining with our longtime partners at Island Lake Lodge (located near Fernie, B.C.) on a Canadian day hike contest.

Why Island Lake Lodge? Because this backcountry operation — internationally renowned for catskiing in winter and year round culinary and spa offerings — is home to some of the most rewarding day hikes you’ll find in the Canadian Rockies.

Think alpine meadows bursting with wildflowers and mountain vistas that fuel the soul!

To enter our contest, all you have to do is comment below and tell us about YOUR favourite Canadian day hike.

Your response doesn’t have to be long. Just send us the location of the hike, and a line or two about why you think your choice deserves recognition.

What’s in it for you? We’re going to mail a surprise “Hiker’s Delight Sweet Swag Package” to our randomly selected lucky winner.

We’ll also keep your comments published on this page as a resource for anyone keen to explore day hike options in Canada.

Good luck! And cheers to you for keeping us all in the know.

— Toque & Canoe

P.S. Contest closes at midnight on June 24, 2019.

 

Note from publisher: This post was powered by Island Lake Lodge. If you’d like a guided hike experience in a unique corner of the Canadian Rockies, check out Island Lake Lodge’s summer schedule here.

 

Founded by two Canucks on the loose in a big country, Toque & Canoe is an award-winning Canadian travel blog. Follow our adventures on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook 

 

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  1. Neil Baskin commented:

    There is so many I could give an honorable mention to,I’ve done quite a few from Ontario,Alberta and BC. Since I’m living in Kelowna, BC I will give a Shout out for one of the many breathtaking hikes. Christie Falls (Bear Creek) the Drive alone to get there is beautiful, with Big Horn Sheep,the odd Bear, Moose and Deer and ofcourse the landscape.Once you get there it’s a wee hike to the spot to descend down to the falls with ropes and trees, I have seen families, couples and singles down there and it is well worth the trek to see these Gorgeous falls and the backdrop and scenery that goes with it.highly recommended.

    Reply

  2. Kelly Ziegelmayer commented:

    My favorite day hike in the Canadian Rockies is hands-down Larch Valley to Sentinel Pass in the Fall. Getting to pass by Moraine Lake on the way up is the ultimate bonus (even better if you’re lucky enough to hop in a canoe for a post-hike paddle)!! The most beautiful place in the world!

    Reply

  3. Pat McInnis commented:

    Picking a favourite day hike is like picking my favourite child. Thinking it over, I have to consider so many factors, but in the end, Larch Valley to Sentinel Pass and down to Paradise Valley is my winner. Why? Fifteen years ago I had a panic attack hiking up to Sentinel Pass (and had to turn around). Two years ago I sailed up the switchbacks to Sentinel Pass without missing a beat. So for me, it is not only a beautiful hike but represents my progression as a hiker. How lucky am I, as an East Coaster to live in Calgary with so many world class hikes at my doorstep?!

    Reply

  4. Tracey commented:

    My favourite day hike has to be Wilcox Pass in Jasper National Park.
    After getting past the treeline it is pure magic and the views are absolutely incredible! You can see for miles, feel the cool wind blow off the snow and ice capped mountains, breathe in the crisp air, and head across the alpine meadow towards the summit. You are rewarded with incredible views of Mt Athabasca, Mt Andromeda, and Mt Kitchener all in their beautiful, mountainous glory, as well as the Columbia Icefields. Plus, the drive down the Icefield Parkway coming from either Jasper or Banff is absolutely stunning.

    Reply

  5. Todd Scott commented:

    I grew up in Manitoba. I have had the chance to live in almost every corner of this country. But I keep coming back to Manitoba and have made this my home base for the last 18 years (or that is how long I have owned a house here) . It is a place that is often overlooked for hiking and outdoor adventures. The advantage of that is you can take your time on our trails and not have to worry about being run over by a mob of people when you stop to take a moment to enjoy the sheer beauty of the outdoors. Or have to worry about being a sweaty mess in the background of hundreds of random strangers selfies on social media.
    We are flat… but just in certain parts. In the West, it is like a scene out of GOT. Where the gently rolling landscape, suddenly runs into a massive wall. This the the Manitoba escarpment and runs from the Pembina valley in the south, to Riding Mountain National Park, and carries on into the Duck Mountains and beyond into Northern Manitoba. There are hundreds of epic hikes in this region as you climb out of the prairies up along the Escarpment and gain breath taking vistas of the checker board of fields below and scoot past amorous moose in the fall during the rut. Sadly I haven’t had time to explore this area very much and keep looking at photos on friends social media and know I am not just having the sensation of FOMO, but I truly am missing out on something spectacular.
    To the East, this is where I usually roam. We have the start of the Canadian Shield and challenging hikes like the aptly named Mantario trail that weaves it way through boreal forests, along granite outcroppings, surrounded by refreshing lakes and streams that dot the border of Manitoba and Ontario. This 3 to 4 day, 60 km hike is a classic that every outdoorsy Canadian should have on their wish list. Just don’t go when I’m planning on going. Thanks.
    My all time favorite hike on the Mantario was when a buddy and I didn’t have time to hike the trail in 3 days. But we figured if we just kept walking, we could do it in 24 hours. We did it in 23 hours technically making it a “Day Hike”. I should also admit I couldn’t walk normally for 3 days. My friend broke all 3 of his flashlights. I gave him mine and had a surreal experience hiking the trail via moonlight. Also during a quick nap on the trail, my hiking partner mistook my snoring for an angry bear in the dark.
    I know Manitoba hiking doesn’t seem as sexy as hiking in BC or Alberta. But I’m no longer in my twenties and sometimes it hurts to get off the couch. To me, hiking in Manitoba is just right.

    Reply

  6. Joanne Elves commented:

    Crypt Lake in Waterton National Park is one of my faves. You need to be dropped off by the local boat tour, hike lush forests past stunning waterfalls, crawl through a cave, cling to the side of a cliff by holding a cable to finally arrive at the lake. If it’s late summer you can walk to the other side of the emerald coloured water where the shore is In Montana. The towering mountain stops you from going any further. The outlet for the lake is an underground stream that spurts from the cliff to tumble to the valley far below. There’s no time to linger…you have to retrace your steps to the launch to catch that ride back to Waterton. Epic all-day adventure.

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Thanks Joanne! We’ve done this one, like 25 years ago. Waterton National Park is remarkably beautiful. We distinctly remember a curious young grizzly, getting the lay of the land while standing up on his hind legs in a meadow near our campsite. Thanks for the reminder. 🙂

      Reply

  7. Nicola Ramsey commented:

    No doubt the Rockies provide some sensational hikes, but I’m putting in a plug for the Freighter Trail that runs along the shore of Lesser Slave Lake. A wander through Alberta’s boreal forest provides sensational views of the lake and it’s ever-changing sand dunes, birdwatching, sightings of wildlife, and a possible stop at the Boreal Bird Observatory. Skiable in winter, the trail can be done in sections or all at once if you have the entire day.

    Reply

  8. Susan Portelance commented:

    Pine Point Rapids in the Whiteshell in Manitoba. I love the rocky terrain of the Canadian Shield, and there are numerous rapids and waterfalls. It’s peaceful and pretty. At around 9km, it’s a good day hike.

    Reply

  9. Melissa Black commented:

    We love the hike to Heart Lake Trail Loop in Ladysmith BC. Its 10 KM long, moderate, with lots of beautiful scenery. Ends at Heart Lake which is beautiful. the trailhead starts on the Holland Creek Trail right in the centre of Ladysmith so its easy to access and find your way. Just a perfect day hike!

    Reply

  10. Chris C commented:

    Favourite Canadian day hike is probably Bunzen Lake in B.C. Dog friendly, not too strenuous, and a dip in the Lake at either end if you want it!

    Reply

      • Britta commented:

        The hiking trail up to the Three Sisters, an iconic mountain near Fernie, BC, is fantastic as it offers some amazing sights along Heiko’s Trail – beautiful old-growth forest, creeks and waterfalls, a cave, a canyon and alpine meadows. Also, the view from the peak is absolutely stunning!

        Reply

  11. Don Enright commented:

    For me, it’s a tossup between Crypt Lake in Waterton, and Mount Indefatigable in Kananaskis Country. Dizzying heights, jaw-dropping views, and alpine wildflowers at your feet. And both will really make you sweat.

    Reply

  12. Sandi Neufeld commented:

    I live in Saskatchewan and I’m a principal at a small school that does land based learning. We are very lucky to live moments away from the North Saskatchewan River and the Fort A La Corne provincial forest. We take our students hiking regularly in all seasons. My favourite trail is the cabin trail on the Gronlid ski trails. In the winter we ski or snowshoe and all other seasons we walk. There is a cabin at the 2 km point and there the trail branches into other trails that weave through pine, spruce and poplar forest. There are gently rolling hills, sandy trails held together with beautiful underbrush. Birds, deer, elk and more grace those trials. A must see in Saskatchewan’s North West!

    Reply

  13. Martine Lapointe commented:

    M’y favorite Trail frime thé Rockies us Edith Cavell Meadows. What us a marvelous place! The mountains, the Lake, the flowers and the rocks!

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Great suggestion Martine. We hiked Edith Cavell once and we couldn’t believe the wildflowers. Every colour of paintbrush you could imagine! Even colours we didn’t know existed! Plus, we remember seeing someone in a wheelchair on much of the trail, which was heartening. Nice to see parts of it wheelchair accessible. T&C

      Reply

  14. Elaine Anhalt commented:

    Stanley Glacier. Cascadess of waterfalls coming off the glacier forming into a beautifil alpine stream with spectacular breataking view.

    Reply

  15. Yvonne Hammersley commented:

    Cirque Peak, even just to Helen Lake (same trail) on Ice Fields Parkway in Alberta. It’s got a nice steady incline, beautiful views, water falls, river crossings & lake views all within 3 hour round trip! You can do it before or after work on a long summer day.

    Reply

  16. Diane commented:

    Mt. Slesse, Chilliwack BC. (Chilliwack Lake Road) Beautiful view of Columbia Valley and majestic mountains.

    Reply

  17. Janice commented:

    The “Crack” at Killarney Provincial Park. It’s a challenging hike but you are rewarded with an amazing view of the park and all of it’s geologic features.

    Reply

  18. Belinda Bertrand commented:

    Frontenac and Provincial Park near Kingston Ontario. It’s a park for backpack camping so no car campers. Long day-hike options available and you can mix and match up your route on the fly. Lots of lakes to spot turtles and deer.

    Reply

  19. Suzanne commented:

    Carthrew-Alderson in Waterton Lakes National Park, the Iceline in Yoho National Park, Lake O’Hara Alpine Circuit and hike to McArthur Lake. Berg Lake in MT Robson..all great hikes!

    Reply

  20. Andrea heath commented:

    Too many to to mention but I did the Berg lake trail last year carrying my 13 month old and I have to say, it was one of the most memorable!
    Second to mention is hermit meadow trail in Rogers Pass. Super steep but leads to stunning alpine meadows with options to summit many peaks including mount Rogers .

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Hi Andrea. Nice to hear from you! How’s that baby? We have a photographer on assignment right now on the Berg Lake Trail. Can’t wait to see his photos! Hope all is well! T&C

      Reply

  21. Jenn Kitunen commented:

    Mt Cheam in chilliwack
    Views of the Fraser valley you can see Vancouver in a clear day.
    5 mins in and you come across the cutest glacier carved lake. Spoon Lake. Wild flowers galore

    Reply

  22. Ryan commented:

    Don’t have much Canadian Day hike experience, but last year was in Banff and hiked up to Helen Lake. Aggresive marmots up there! The weather was beautiful and had a great time with friends.

    Reply

  23. Adam Hill commented:

    Cape Breton has dozens of amazing day hikes but my personal favourite has to be Franey Mountain in the Cape Breton Highlands National Park. It’s not a very difficult or long hike but the view of the highlands and the coast is extraordinary!

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Thanks Adam. We did Franey Mountain when we were in Cape Breton Highlands National Park and we agree, fantastic view and wonderful hike over all. Thanks mister! T&C

      Reply

  24. Misty Hawes commented:

    My favourite hike is probably The Pinnacles (also called Twin Lakes) in the Monashee Mountains. Just because of the memories that my family has made doing this hike together, many times, over the years.

    Reply

  25. Julie Dowling commented:

    A great hike to do is in the Limberlost Forest, Huntsville, Ontario. There is a very nice trail around Solitaire lake, where you can walk high up on a rock shelf, to a scenic wooden walkway across the water. The trail hugs the lake, with a beautiful path. 5 other lakes in the park provide more trails if you wish. Please go to the check in cabin to find a map, and have a great day! Free of charge too.

    Reply

  26. Sara Wells commented:

    Lindeman lake, Chilliwack, BC. Good payoff for the effort and can be easily extended into an overnight if you want to.

    Reply

  27. Brad Davies commented:

    The amazing, historic and out of this world beautiful Lower Stein Valley near Lytton. Just getting there is half the fun, but once you do…ancient pictographs, culturally modified trees, natural beauty, waterfalls, old growth forests, wildlife, abandoned cabins await as you follow along and over the pristine Stein River.

    Reply

  28. Will Lambert commented:

    If you don’t mind a long day then one of my favourites for sure is out in Kananaskis Country, AB. – Ribbon Lake to Galatea Lake.

    Start your day at Kananaskis Village day parking and hike along ribbon creek up to ribbon lake. At the end of the valley to reach the lake you’ll have to climb a chained section (approx 30m) which is a real rush! At the lake we saw a mother Moose with two calves. There’s a Backcountry campsite here you can stay at right by the lake which would be idyllic. Head over Guinn’s pass and descend through alpine flower meadows to Galatea lake. The top one is glacier fed and icy blue, a perfect stop for a dip if you’re brave enough! Then head down the trail which winds through large hemlock and spruce trees before finishing with a beautiful gorge boardwalk. The entire hike circles Mount Kidd, and once you reach the base, you can either hitchhike (as we did) or walk the 8km Extra back to your starting point.

    For me, this hike ticks so many boxes! Add it to you’re list.

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Great recommendation Will. We just shared a photo on our FB page featuring a painting of K-Country. Very dear to our hearts, for sure. We’ve heard about this hike for years. Your comment has us thinking this is the summer to do it! Hopefully the wildfire smoke in Alberta subsides. T&C

      Reply

  29. Christine Daniels commented:

    Prince Albert National Park in Saskatchewan has several great day hikes. It’s up north, and full of forest. Even the scenic route driving in to Waskesiu is worth it.

    Reply

  30. Julie Bince commented:

    I only have a few seasons of hiking under my belt but my favourite day hike is Prairie Mountain in Kananaskis. It was the first hike I ever did in the mountains, straight up (or so it seemed) to start but the view was amazing. Standing by the Canada flag perched at the summit and being able to see Calgary in the distance was breathtaking! It was humbling to realize that that was the first time I was at that altitude from land and not a plane and that a 50 year old gal made it up there under her own steam! Awesome!

    Reply

  31. Sarah Downey commented:

    My favourite day hike is the Edgar Baird Trail in Gander, NL. It has everything, from the bottomless and often foggy lake, to a moss carpet covered enchanted forest with a twisting path among it. It has elevation, but is fairly accessible even for a beginner. It offers complete peace and quiet to find yourself in. It has healed me.

    Reply

  32. Ben Cross commented:

    The Alpine Circuit at Lake O’Hara. The most bang for you buck of any hike in Canada. Amazing alpine views – mountains, lakes, and glaciers – right from the start. Unbeatable.

    Reply

  33. Rod Dunnett commented:

    A shout out for the West Kootenay here.
    A real favourite for families is the Idaho Peak trail out of Sandon. Because you drive into the sub alpine it is not strenuous, but the 360 degree views are only surpassed by the incredible display of flowers.
    Want a longer hike (and there are so many to choose from)? Monica Meadows is the place to go. Up at the end of Glacier Creek road from Duncan Lake, you switchback up to huge meadows dotted with lovely alpine lakes with a backdrop of the McBeth Icefield. Oh, and Jumbo Pass hike is a few kilometres down the road!

    Reply

  34. J commented:

    Valley of the Five Lakes …because the hike has alpine flowers and a beautiful viewpoint of the emerald water! And because we did it with our baby this year!

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Thanks J. Impressive that you did it with your baby. Way to start them young. We love the Jasper area so nice to have an excuse to go back. Cheers for taking the time to comment! T&C

      Reply

  35. Sawyer commented:

    Lake of the Hanging Glacier in the Purcell Mountians is one of my favourite days hikes! Crystal blue water and something new at every elevation.

    Reply

  36. Susan Johnson commented:

    It is so hard to choose just one as there are so many beautiful hikes in the Alberta Rockies. I guess if I need to narrow it to one that would be the skoki loop in lake Louise. The mountain meadows in July are brilliant with wild flowers. So beautiful. Others to mention are
    Crypt lake in waterton alberta
    Tower of Babel moraine lake
    The larches ( sentinal pass) in October lake Louise
    I could go on forever.
    One last one as it is near and dear to my heart.
    My dad climbed this and he died before I really knew him. I followed his foot steps up. Kinda cool
    That hike is yamnuska

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      What a story Susan. I bet your Dad would like to know that you followed his footsteps up Yamnuska. A hike, we’ve learned, can be so much more than a hike. Thanks for your thoughtful post. T&C

      Reply

  37. Heather Yule commented:

    Immediately my mind goes to the amazing Skyline Trail in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. Just the right length for a few hours of fun by foot, rewarded with ferns and forests, gentle salty breezes, beautiful butterflies and birds among the wildflowers, unforgettable ocean views where green mountains meet the sea, and you’ll likely see a moose or three! PS – it’s magical in a misty fog too!

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Thanks for this Heather. We agree. Wonderful trail! Plus good for all ages and stages and a heck of a view. Even a few wild blueberries along the trail as well from what we can recall! Cheers, T&C

      Reply

  38. Maggie Gibson commented:

    East Sooke Park, Cabin Point Trail. It gives you ocean views, glimpses of history, elevation gain, and plenty of muddy patches. Everything to make a solid hike.

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Thanks so much Brenda! We’ve visited Georgian Bay once and we’ll never forget this unique, Canadian landscape. And yes, the early morning effort to be anywhere for sunrise always pays off. 🙂 T&C

      Reply

  39. Fred Sheppard commented:

    My fav day hike is Green Gardens in Gros Morne National Park. Mantle rock, meets sea stacks, meets sea caves, meets volcanic coastal meadows, all under the gaze of whales, sea birds and wandering flocks of curious sheep.

    Reply

  40. Thomas K Telfer commented:

    This is too hard! If I can only have one… I guess my absolute favorite has been a section of the Coastal Trail in Lake Superior Provincial park, from the Agawa Pictographs to the Visitor’s Centre at the south end of the park. Of course, the Orphan lake trail in Superior is pretty great. I loved hiking the Eiffel Lake trail in Banff. And Robertson cliffs just North of Sault Ste Marie is a lot of fun… ARGHHHHHH!!! You can’t make me pick one!

    Reply

  41. Beth Scammell commented:

    I’m on the East Coast so hopefully I cad add something to the great mix here! My favourite day hike is to the top of Mount Carleton, in Northern New Brunswick. It’s the tallest mountain in the Maritime provinces and the views are spectacular. The literature provided by the park says you can see 10 million trees from the peak, where there’s an old fire ranger station. Lots of other great hikes in this park, too, but this one is my favourite. And I find this area gets overlooked for the more touristy places so it’s not as busy. Do it in the fall when the leaves are changing colour and the bugs aren’t as bad.

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Thanks so much Beth. Excellent to see New Brunswick up here and an excellent recommendation. Cheers for taking the time and for enriching our Canadian day hike repertoire. T&C

      Reply

  42. Elise Maltinsky commented:

    Oh…this is so hard! I worked in the Rockies for over 25 years and now live in the Yukon. I’d say my most favourite day hike is Bald Hills at Maligne Lake in Jasper National Park. It’s one of those great Alpine areas offering superb views of a gorgeous big lake and surrounding peaks. A close second is Healy Pass in Banff National Park in the early part of the summer because of the profusion of wildflowers.

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Hey Elise. Cheers for taking the time to comment! We’ll definitely check out these two hikes. We’re en route to Yoho National Park shortly. Feel lucky to have all these national parks in our backyard given that our base in Calgary. T&C

      Reply

  43. Michelle commented:

    Top of the Giant in Sleeping Giant Provincial Park near Thunder Bay.
    On a clear day the views across Lake Superior are amazing.

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Great recommendation Michelle. We’re going to research Sleeping Giant Provincial Park right away. We’ve experienced Lake Superior’s world-renowned sunsets. Pretty unforgettable. T&C

      Reply

  44. Holly commented:

    One of my favourite day hikes is on Newfoundland’s East Coast Trail just a 15-20 minute drive from St. John’s. The trail is named Blackhead Trail and is located just West of Cape Spear National Historic Site which is also known as the most Easterly point in Canada.

    This day hike is between Blackhead and Fort Amherst (another historic site). Some of the amazing views on the trail include breath taking coastal views, rugged cliffs, a beach rock break water with stepping stones, An old ship wreck at Fresh Water Bay, and a beautiful view of Signal Hill can be achieved after the steep ascent to the top of the Southside Hill’s.

    To through hike this trail on average usually takes around 3 hrs. If you like to hike and are visiting Newfoundland I believe this is a must do! Enjoy.

    Reply

  45. Linda Emslie commented:

    The Bruce trail along the Niagara Escarpment runs for almost 900 km of main trail plus multiple side trails. There are multiple day hike options with wineries, wildflowers, woods, industrial history, Great Lakes (two) and ski hills among many intriguing places to explore.

    Reply

  46. Sophie LaMarre commented:

    My favourite day hike is the Green Gardens Trail in Gros Morne National Park on the west coast of Newfoundland! Fantastic coastal scenery including meadows and sea spires. If you’re lucky, you might even meet the resident sheep.

    Reply

  47. Alice commented:

    Hiking up to Mummery Glacier (near Golden, B.C.) from the back end of the Blaeberry valley is my favourite way to fill a day. It’s a hidden gem, and I love it not only because you’re surrounded by incredible mountains, wildlife and history of David Thompson’s journey through the Howse Pass, nor because rarely do you see more humans than moose up there, but because that part of the world owns a special piece of my heart from when the Blaeberry was my backyard. I live in Nova Scotia now and would recommend Pollet’s Cove on Cape Breton Island for views that make you feel like you’re at the edge of the earth.

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Hi Alice! Beautiful suggestion – plus, you’ve covered B.C. and Nova Scotia, bracketing the country well with two great hikes. Thanks for keeping us in the know! T&C

      Reply

  48. David Finch commented:

    Turkey on The Mountain
    Our favourite day hike is up Jumping Pound Mountain near the summit of the Powderface Trail near Bragg Creek. The front range of the Kananaskis region is little explored and we love the views.
    An easy hike and less than 90 minutes from Calgary, the summit of Jumping Pound Mountain offers spectacular panoramic views – and Moose Mountain to the East blocks out most of Calgary!
    We’ve been taking cold turkey and all the trimmings up Jumping Pound Mountain regularly on Thanksgiving – when the weather allows – for more than a decade.
    Jeannie and David Finch

    Reply

  49. Christina Somers commented:

    My husband and I took our kids on a hike to The Grotto in Bruce Peninsula, Ontario. We were all amazed by how incredibly beautiful it was. The jewel tone colours of the water was like a scene from a Caribbean coastline! Climbing down the escarpment to explore the cave was awesome and unforgettable. We went back in the winter and were able to walk all the way around on the frozen lake to explore even more caves. A true gem in our own Canadian backyard!

    Reply

  50. Nadine Smith commented:

    Hiking to Mystic Beach on Vancouver Island my favourite. You get to see lots of forest, an abundance of green and when you get to the beach, you experience the most amazing waterfall. It’s not an extremely difficult hike but it’s enough to get you happy in a total forest and ocean experience!

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Hey Shannon. We were just in Yoho National Park — definitely one of our favourite national parks. Next time, and when the snow is gone (we had an almost summer snowfall when we were there last week!), we’ll be sure to check it out. Thanks for taking the time. T&C

      Reply

  51. Wayne Wentzloff commented:

    Ahhh , it’s been a while since I was out because of my arthritis but when I close my eyes, I see the flowers and the peaks across the valley. Down below is Egypt Lake sparkling its glacial blue. All this from the trail that begins near Sunshine Village in Banff National Park!

    Reply

  52. Kevin Taylor commented:

    My favourite day hike here in the Yukon is the “Sam McGee Trail”, also known as “Lower Mountain Hero” on the side of Montana Mountain. The trailhead is near the abandoned townsite of Conrad. This gorgeous trail takes you through aspens at the trailhead, following a historic trail & remnants of a tramway, along the creek and up into balsam trees. Easy switchbacks give you sneak previews of the views and finally out into the open alpine with even more beautiful views!
    Nine or ten Kms return with about 620m of elevation gain.

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Thanks Kevin. Great suggestion. Another reason to find our way back to the Yukon. We attended the Adäka Fest in Whitehorse last summer which was fantastic. Cheers for taking the time! T&C

      Reply

  53. Anne Quesnelle commented:

    My favoutite day hike is going up «  The Crack » situated just before Killarney provincial park. This trail got its name « The Crack” because of a deep crevasse that forms walls on the sides of the trail. Once through the crack you will be treated to one of the most beautiful views in the park. This panoramic vista allows you to look down upon crystal blue Killarney and O.S.A. lakes.

    Reply

  54. Colleen commented:

    So many great hikes throughout Canada but two standouts are the Fundy Trails, and Sulphur Ridge Skyline in Jasper which is my favourite. The views on this unspoiled and challenging but accessible hike are breath-taking. Hikers of all ages enjoy this spectacular trail from spring to fall and often encounter wildlife in their natural habitat, and colourful mountain meadows that are among the most beautiful in the world. An annual hike enjoyed by nature lovers from around the world and one I will enjoy once again this summer.

    Reply

  55. Joanne Bradley commented:

    Oka Park, the Laurentian’s, Quebec.
    You can choose between three hikes, one to a man made lake, one up the mountain to shrines and a great outlook across the lake, and a marsh & boardwalk hike that is famous for herons’ nests!

    Reply

  56. dwane commented:

    Anywhere in the upper Thelon River watershed. Where we are going this summer, problem is it takes a lot of effort to wake up out there so you can do that day hike.

    Reply

  57. Genevieve C commented:

    Sulphur Skyline is a favourite. Not only do you get to enjoy great views at the peak, but you return to Miette Hot Springs where you can soak your tired body after the hike.

    Reply

  58. Barry Moon commented:

    My wife and I went on the 2 km (one way) Hoodoo Trail in Writing on Stone Provincial Park in southern Alberta for the first time last week. An awesome trail with fantastic rock formations to look at and explore. This is a photographer’s heaven as indicated by the number of images on my camera memory card. Highly recommended!

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Thanks for this Barry! Glad you figured out how to leave your comment. 🙂 We’ve never been but we’re definitely going now and yes, we’ll be bringing our camera gear. Cheers for taking the time to contribute here. Best, T&C

      Reply

  59. Taku commented:

    Someone may have mentioned this already but the Crack hiking trail up north of Killarney Provincial Park in Ontario is a great hike that offers fantastic views after some scrambling at the top. The climb at the end is well worth the effort though.

    Reply

    • toque & canoe commented:

      Thank you Taku! Yes, it has been mentioned but great to get a second motion on this hike. We’re loving hearing from so many different provinces and territories. Cheers for taking the time! T&C

      Reply

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